Our research center for Epistemic Game Theory is located at Maastricht University

EpiCenter Spring Course in Epistemic Game Theory 2016

July 5 – July 19, 2016

Maastricht University

 course_2016

 Group 2016-text

 

Christian Bach in action during the first day

Christian Bach in action during the first day

 

Audience during first day

Audience during first day

 

Audience during the first day

Audience during the first day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christian Nauerz in action during his first exercise session.

Christian Nauerz in action during his first exercise session.

 

Andrés Perea in action during his lecture.

Andrés Perea in action during his lecture.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elias in action during his lecture.

Elias in action during his lecture.

Stephan Jagau in action during his exercise session.

Stephan Jagau in action during his exercise session.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Register: Please send an E-mail to Andrés Perea at course@epicenter.name  Please state clearly your university, type of student or position (bachelor-, master- or PhD-student, or researcher) and your background/field of expertise. The registration deadline is May 31, 2016.

Registration fee: The registration fee is 80 euros. Please transfer 80 euros, mentioning “EGT course” and your name, to:

Maastricht University

IBAN: NL05 INGB 0657 6187 05, SWIFT (or BIC) code: INGBNL2A

Bank address: ING Bank, Oost-Brabant BB, Schimmelt 36, 5611 ZX Eindhoven, The Netherlands

Beneficiary address: Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands

Please mention clearly “EGT course” and your name.  Otherwise we cannot trace your payment! The fee has to be paid before May 31, 2016.

Purpose of this course: The EpiCenter, our research center on Epistemic Game Theory at Maastricht University, offers this two-week intensive course as an introduction to the blooming field of Epistemic Game Theory. This field studies how people reason in game theoretic situations before they eventually make a choice. For more information about our EpiCenter, please visit our website: http://www.epicenter.name/

Audience: The course is primarily meant for advanced bachelor students, master students and PhD students all over the world, but researchers are also very welcome.

Instructors: The instructors for this course are Christian Bach,  Stephan Jagau (University of Amsterdam), Christian Nauerz, Andrés Perea and Elias Tsakas — all members of our EpiCenter.

Christian Bach

Christian Bach

Christian Nauerz

Andrés Perea

Andrés Perea

 

Elias Tsakas

Elias Tsakas

 

 

 

 

Jagau-Stephan2-220x260

Stephan Jagau

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Literature: The course will be based on the textbook Epistemic Game Theory: Reasoning and Choice by Andrés Perea (Cambridge University Press, 2012).

Cover

If you would like to order the book, please click here.   It is highly recommended to purchase this book for the course, as most lectures, and all exercise sessions, will be based on the book.

Organization of the course: The course stretches over 11 days, of which the last day consists of a written exam. Typically, a day consists of two theory lectures, and one exercise session. where the two theory lectures cover one chapter from the book “Epistemic Game Theory: Reasoning and Choice”. In the exercise sessions we will discuss some problems from the book which you should prepare the day before. On day 4 and 8 of the course we will offer some theory lectures on more advanced topics, which are not included in the book. Your grade will be based on the exam. But you are also free to participate without taking the exam. If you successfully take the exam, you will earn 6.5 ECTS.

Housing: If you would like to rent a room in Maastricht at a reasonable price during these two weeks, please visit: http://www.maastrichthousing.com/Furnished_rooms/

Last year’s course: For an impression of the course we gave in 2015, please click here

Questions? If you have further questions, please send an E-mail to Andrés Perea at: course@epicenter.name

Lecture slides:

Common belief in rationality      Pearce’s Lemma       Simple belief hierarchies

Advanced topics: Universal type space      Primary belief in the opponent’s rationality

Respecting the opponent’s preferences    Assuming the opponent’s rationality

Advanced topics: Games with incomplete information

Belief in the opponent’s future rationality      Strong belief in the opponent’s rationality

 

 Schedule

  All sessions will take place in the building of the School of Business and Economics

 Tongersestraat 53, Maastricht

Schedule